The Elms College Center for Law and Justice was created to spread the Catholic social justice traditions to the greater community. Catholic social teaching is based on and inseparable from our understanding of human life and human dignity, and here at Elms, we believe everyone deserves the right to justice.

Lecture Series Brings Social Justice to Campus and Community

Wed Dec 5, 2012

The Elms College Center for Law and Justice was created to spread the Catholic social justice traditions to the greater community. Catholic social teaching is based on and inseparable from our understanding of human life and human dignity, and here at Elms, we believe everyone deserves the right to justice.

The Center for Law and Justice Lecture Series aims to bring speakers to the Western Massachusetts community who have proven their commitment to social justice. These speakers will come from a wide range of professions-from lawyers and victim advocates to police officers and federal agents.

Thomas Foley Jan Schlichtmann

Two prominent legal professionals came to campus this semester, and spoke on topics widely publicized in the media as well as throughout their respective industries. Retired Massachusetts State Police Colonel Thomas Foley (left photo) discussed the investigation that led to murder and racketeering charges against James "Whitey" Bulger; an investigation in which Foley played a major role. He signed copies of his book, "Most Wanted: Pursuing Whitey Bulger, the Murderous Mob Chief the FBI Secretly Protected."

Attorney Jan Schlichtmann (right photo) represented Woburn, Massachusetts families in the Anderson v. Cryovac case, which alleged that W. R. Grace and Beatrice Foods had dumped chemicals that contaminated drinking water. The case was chronicled in book and film, "A Civil Action," starring John Travolta as Schlichtmann. Schlichtmann gave a powerful speech about the emotional and financial impact his case against Beatrice Foods and W.R. Grace had on his life. He expressed his current views of the court system and how the use of mediation and negotiation is producing positive results for the victims of environmental toxins.

Two additional speakers are planned for the spring 2013 semester.